Strongholds of Political Power, Strongholds of Resistance

Securing monumental structures on the Zimbabwe plateau and adjacent regions (1100-1900 AD)

 

ATTENTION! New  appointment! Scheduled now on 3rd June!

 

STRONGHOLDS OF THE WORLD

Interdisciplinary lecture series

of the Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V., Germany, and Aarhus University, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, Denmark

6th meeting

When: Friday, June 3, 2022

Entry: 12:30 CET. Begin: 13:00 CET

Topic: Strongholds of Political Power, Strongholds of Resistance: Securing monumental structures on the Zimbabwe plateau and adjacent regions (1100-1900 AD)

Register in advance for this webinar:

When: Friday, May 06, 2022

Entry: 12:30 CET. Begin: 13:00 CET

Topic: Strongholds of Political Power, Strongholds of Resistance: Securing monumental structures on the Zimbabwe plateau and adjacent regions (1100-1900 AD)

https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HO30V7hrRwuirXXYlqprvQ

Or on H.323/SIP room sestem:

H.323: 109.105.112.236 or 109.105.112.235

Meeting ID: 659 0349 4238

SIP: 65903494238@109.105.112.236 or 65903494238@109.105.112.235

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

Innocent Pikirayi, PhD

Department of Anthropology, Archaeology and Development Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028, SOUTH AFRICA

 

Strongholds of Political Power, Strongholds of Resistance:

Securing monumental structures on the Zimbabwe plateau and adjacent regions (1100-1900 AD)

During the early second millennium AD, the Zimbabwe Tradition, a settlement system synonymous with state-level societies developed on the Zimbabwe plateau and adjacent regions. Characterised by monumental stone-walled structures, antiquarians and early archaeologists interpreted these as ‘forts’, linked to long-distance trade. Referring to early sixteenth century Great Zimbabwe, Portuguese chronicler João de Barros remarked that it “is guarded by a nobleman, who has charge of it, after the manner of a chief alcaide, and they call this officer Symbacayo ….” Alcaide is an Iberian term borrowed from Arabic al-qāʼid, meaning commander of fort or castle. I employ the concept of ‘stronghold’ beyond European understandings of Medieval fortifications or castles, to denote power and understand how monumental structures served ruling elites. European concepts of defence cannot be applied to understand the construction and function of sites such as Great Zimbabwe.

With European expansion into the African interior after 1500 AD, the same region witnessed both European and local strongholds (‘loopholed forts’), the latter constructed to resist Portuguese attacks. These were ‘strongholds of resistance’. To survive European siege warfare, these strongholds also used European weaponry. The term ‘Refuge Tradition’, was an unsuccessful attempt by some archaeologists to characterise the rise of hilltop and fortified settlements from 1700 to the onset of British rule in 1890.

 

Our speaker

Innocent Pikirayi, PhD

Innocent Pikirayi made his BA in History, an MA in African History an his PhD in Archaeology.

From 2010 to 2019, Innocent Pikirayi served as Professor in Archaeology and Chair in the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology at the University of Pretoria. He is now Professor and Deputy Dean responsible for Postgraduate Studies and Research Ethics in the Faculty of Humanities at the same university. In 2019, he was Visiting Professor in Archaeology at the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) at Aarhus University in Denmark. He is also serving as Honorary Research Associate of the McDonald Institute, University of Cambridge, for three years until 30th September 2023.

Innocent Pikirayi serves as advisors to the following journals in archaeology and the broader humanities: Azania: Archaeological in Africa (Routledge), African Archaeological Review (Springer), Antiquity: A Review of World Archaeology, The Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology, and the African Humanities Publication (AHP) Series (Carnegie Corporation).

Innocent Pikirayi is a member of the World Archaeological Congress (WAC), the Society for American Archaeology (SAA), the Society of Africanist Archaeologists (SAfA), the Shanghai Archaeology Forum (SAF), the Association of Southern African Professional Archaeologists (ASAPA), the South African Archaeological Society (ArchSoc), the Integrated History and Future of People on Earth (IHOPE), and the Academy of Science South Africa (ASSAf).

 

Select References on Great Zimbabwe:

Bent, J. T. 1896. The ruined cities of Mashonaland. London: Spottiswoode.

Beach, D. N. 1988. ‘Refuge’ archaeology, trade and gold mining in nineteenth-century Zimbabwe: Izidoro Correia Pereira’s list of 1857. Zimbabwean Prehistory 20, 3-8.

Garlake, P. S. 1973. Great Zimbabwe. London: Thames and Hudson.

Pikirayi, I. 2000. Wars, violence and strongholds: an overview of fortified settlements in northern Zimbabwe. Journal of Peace, Conflict and Military Studies 1 (1), 1-12.

Pikirayi, I. 2009. Palaces, Feiras and Prazos: An Historical Archaeological Perspective of African–Portuguese Contact in Northern Zimbabwe. African Archaeological Review 26 (3), 163-185.

Pikirayi, I. 2013. Stone architecture and the development of power in the Zimbabwe tradition AD 1270-1830. Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa 48 (2), 282-300.

Randall-MacIver, D. 1906. Medieval Rhodesia. London: Macmillan and Co. Ltd.

 

Six principal and relevant publications by Pikirayi:

Pikirayi, I. and Magoma, M. 2021. Retrieving Intangibility, Stemming Biodiversity Loss: The Case of Sacred Places in Venda, Northern South Africa. Heritage, 4, 4524–4541. https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4040249

Kusimba, C.M. and Pikirayi, I. 2020. A Conversation with Peter Ridgway Schmidt, the Ṣango of African Archaeology. African Archaeological Review 37, 185–223, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10437-020-09385-8

Pikirayi, I. 2017. Ingombe Ilede and the demise of Great Zimbabwe. Antiquity: A Review of World Archaeology 91 (318), 1085-1086, https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.9

Pikirayi, I. 2018. Investigating Complexity: Great Zimbabwe from a Multidisciplinary Perspective. In Ekblom, A., Isendahl, C. and Lindholm, K-J (eds). The Resilience of Heritage: Cultivating a Future of the Past – Essays in Honour of Professor Paul J.J. Sinclair. Uppsala University: African and Comparative Archaeology, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, 83-100.

Pikirayi, I. 2019. Local narratives, regional histories and the demise of Great Zimbabwe. In Schmidt, P. and Kehoe, A. B. (eds). Archaeologies of Listening. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 131-153.

Pikirayi, I. 2019. Sustainability and an archaeology of the future. Antiquity: A Review of World Archaeology 93 (372), 1669-1671, https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2019.182

Sulas, F. and Pikirayi, I. (eds). 2018. Water and Ancient Societies: Resilience, decline and revival. New York and London: Routledge.

 

GURNESS: A NEW CHAPTER FOR AN OLD STORY

Strongholds of the World

Interdisciplinary lecture series of the

Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V., Germany,

and Aarhus University, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, Denmark

in 2022

5th meeting:

Kevin Kerr BA, Msc

Gurness: A new chapter for an old story

Among the hundreds of Broch structures in the Atlantic zone of modern Scotland, Gurness stands iconic. The brooding, two-thousand-year-old remains convey a real sense of the strength, power and success of a middle Iron Age community in Orkney. Interpretations have traditionally placed the towers as defensive, acting both as a village refuge and as a deterrent from coastal raids. Modern excavation elsewhere in Orkney, however, is proving that Broch complexes were much more integral to the lives of the communities they served. In this lecture, my aim is to introduce Gurness both as an existing icon of Broch studies but also to highlight its potential as a contributor to new interpretations.

Our speaker:

Kevin Kerr BA, Msc

Kerr has been involved in field Archaeology for the last 13 years with the last 6 based on Orkney. He currently works for the Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology (ORCA) as a field archaeologist. Kerr has been heavily involved on most of the major research digs on Orkney and has been the small finds officer for The Cairns Broch excavations since 2016. He is also a seasonal custodian at the Broch of Gurness for Historic Environment Scotland. Kerr currently is completing a Master of Research degree at the UHI based on the findings of excavations at The Cairns and their implications for older excavations such as Gurness.

When: Friday, February 11, 2022

Entry: 12:30 CET. Begin: 13:00 CET

Topic: Gurness: a new chapter of an old story

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_q8a_6BChSR-sbWdl6LU1Pw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Alexandria’s Urban Fortifications under Mamluk and Ottoman Rule

Strongholds of the World Lecture Series, Part 3 – now online on youtube! See beyond!

with Dr. Kathrin Machinek, Alexandria

Interdisciplinary lecture series of the Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V., Germany, and Aarhus University, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, Denmark

Alexandria, fort Qaitbay

Alexandria’s urban fortifications under Mamluk and Ottoman rule

This session from our lecture series “Strongholds of the World” sheds light upon the defense systems of the Mamluk and Ottoman period Alexandria. Alexandria, Egypt’s main seaport on the Mediterranean shore, was often praised by travelers from the past for its impressive fortifications. Nowadays, only few remnants exist of the former urban defense system, the city walls, forts and watchtowers having almost entirely been demolished in the late 19th century by the rapidly expanding modern city.

As a coastal border town, medieval Alexandria was constantly a target for enemy invasions, thus the various Islamic rulers kept renovating and modernizing the fortifications. After the disastrous raid of Alexandria by the Cypriots in 1365, the Mamluk sultans repaired the damages and established new strongholds. In 1477, the entrance to the Eastern harbor was secured by a new majestic fortress, constructed on the ruins of the famous ancient lighthouse.

After the conquest of Mamluk Egypt by the Ottomans in 1516, Alexandria was located within the territory dominated by the Sublime Porte and therefore less exposed to seaborne attacks. The citizens started to settle outside the city walls between the two harbors and abandoned the old town intra muros. Nevertheless, the Ottoman governors preserved the urban fortifications and added new forts in the harbor zone.

Our Speaker:

Dr. Kathrin Machinek, research engineer at the French CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), is working as a building historian at the Centre d’Études Alexandrines, USR 3134, in Alexandria/ Egypt, under the direction of Dr. Marie-Dominique Nenna. [https://www.cealex.org/le-cealex/annuaire/km/]

She obtained a Phd in architecture at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany: « The Qaitbay fort in Alexandria – History and Architecture of a Mamluk fortress in the urban defense system of Alexandria » [https://publikationen.bibliothek.kit.edu/1000047346]

 Research themes:

  • Military history and fortifications of Alexandria
  • Islamic fortifications from the Middle Ages to modern time
  • Medieval and Ottoman Alexandria
  • Mamluk architecture
  • Archaeological excavations at fort Qaitbay and fort Tabiyet Nahassin in Alexandria
  • Features of Pharaonic architecture in Alexandria

Short Bibliography:

  1. Machinek 2020, « Deux citernes hypostyles dans le fort Qaitbay (Alexandrie) », in M.-D. Nenna (ed.), Alexandrina 5, ÉtAlex 50, Alexandria, 2020, p. 439-464 (to go to press).
  2. Machinek 2018, « Alexandria – Ottoman fortifications in a Mediterranean trading town », Symposium Fortifications of the Ottoman period in the Aegean, Ephorate of Lesbos, 30th October – 31st October 2018, p. 239-250 (to go to press).
  3. Machinek 2015, « Aperçu sur les fortifications médiévales d’Alexandrie. Histoire, architecture et archéologie », in M. Eychenne, A. Zouache (ed.), La guerre dans le Proche-Orient: État de la question, lieux communs, nouvelles approches, RAPH 37, Cairo, Damascus, 2015, p. 363-394.
  4. Machinek 2014, « Hygiene in islamischen Festungsbauten », in O. Wagener (ed.), Aborte im Mittelalter und der Frühen Neuzeit – Bauforschung, Archäologie, Kulturgeschichte, Studien zur internationalen Architektur- und Kunstgeschichte117, Petersberg, 2014, p. 292-301.
  5. Machinek 2014, Das Fort Qaitbay in Alexandria – Baugeschichte und Architektur einer mamlukischen Hafenfestung im mittelalterlichen Stadtbefestigungssystem von Alexandria, PhD thesis, submitted at the Department of Architecture, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in 2014.
  6. Machinek 2010, « Der Wandel der Stadtbefestigung Alexandrias vom Mittelalter bis in die Gegenwart », in O. Wagener (ed.), vmbringt mit starcken turnen, murn – Ortsbefestigungen im Mittelalter, Beihefte zur Mediaevistik15, Frankfurt a.M., 2010, p. 431-450.
  7. Machinek 2009, Le fort Qaitbay, Les petits guides d’Alexandrie, Alexandria, 2009, edition in English, French and Arabic.

Coastal Defences of Maharashtra, India

Attention! 

The lecture is now online:

Strongholds of the World Lecture Series, Part 2

with Archana Deshmukh, Pune

Interdisciplinary lecture series of the Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V., Germany, and Aarhus University, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, Denmark

When: September 10, 2021

Entry: 1:30 PM Copenhagen. Begin: 02:00 PM Copenhagen

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_I42w6nXTQKSfMxUANLvUIg

Or an H.323/SIP room system:

 H.323: 109.105.112.236 or 109.105.112.235

 Meeting ID: 648 0719 3180

 SIP: 64807193180@109.105.112.236 or 64807193180@109.105.112.235

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

Coastal Defences of Maharashtra, India

This session from our lecture series “Strongholds of the World” will shed light upon the various typologies of defense systems along the western coast of Maharashtra, India, popularly known as Konkan. The components of defense systems comprises of island forts, coastal forts, fortified factories, fortified outposts, archeological remains, historic settlements, historic monuments and other cultural resources which form many complex military coastal cultural landscapes.

The Konkan is a narrow strip of land between the Arabian Sea and the Sahyadri Range famously known as Western Ghats, is not a continuous strip. The spurs of the Sahyadries gradually lose height as they approach the coast, and far in the sea they create islands. A distinctive feature of the coastline and to site varied typology of the built and natural heritage, and its historical, cultural, military, ecological significance within this region is the consequence of human interventions in the past, and testimony to the various cultures, the contribution of defense systems, which evolved and enriched this land. Due to its rich Maritime Tradition, trade and commerce flourished from ancient times.

The maritime forts which were built to guard commercial and territorial interests narrate stories about trade routes, piracy and battles and above all the aspirations of mankind to travel to new territories to better their lives. The forts, therefore, must be seen as the symbols of such aspirations and more specifically as important defense systems and military warfare in terms to understand the growth of this area in terms of cultural resources which includes various typologies of forts, its defense mechanism to protect the boundaries and to mark the territories

Our Speaker:

Archana Deshmuk is a practicing principal conservation architect of “Nasadeeya” Architecture and conservation firm based in Pune, Maharashtra. She has pursued Architecture degree from Maharashtra and Masters from New Delhi in Architectural Conservation. She has been in the field for more than twelve years and has worked in Rajasthan, Maharashtra and Gujarat on various projects related to forts and fortified heritage. She stood a merit student in her masters thesis about Maritime coastal cultural landscape of coastal Maharashtra in 2011. In February 2017 she organized a tour for Fortress group to study forts and fortifications of coastal and western Maharashtra with support of NscFORT, also organized a seminar in collaboration with MTDC, ASI and State Archeology along with various NGO’s working on Forts in Pune, Maharashtra.

 

Strongholds of the World – part I online

The first session of our lecture series “Strongholds of the World” is now online!

The webinar series Strongholds of the World will present non-European fortresses and fortified towns from around the world.

This series is a cooperation between Aarhus University research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage” and the Marburg Working Group for European Castle Research.

Our member Dr. Doo-Won Cho is speaking about  the Korean fortress of Namhansanseong.

Namhansanseong is a fortified town built since the 12th century on several hills close to Seoul that has been used as a stronghold until the 20th century.  About 30 min presentation is followed by a discussion.

Enjoy!

A military Stronghold “Namhansanseong” in Korea

STRONGHOLDS OF THE WORLD LECTURE SERIES, PART I

When: Feb 4, 2021, 12:30 CET

 

PH.D. Doo-Won Cho, Seoul:

The military stronghold ‘Namhansanseong’ in Korea

Namhansanseong was an important military stronghold, as well as an emergency capital, from the 7th Century to the late 19th Century. Namhansanseong was never taken by enemies, though it was witness to several national and international battles throughout its history, and acted as a symbol of the defense of the kingdom with a Buddhist spirit of patriotism. The fortress was constructed by military Buddhist monks and managed for military purposes with 10 temples for the Buddhist monk army (Seungyeong Sachal) which was located inside the fortress for 300 years. The fortress is very meaningful historically and academically, not least because it shows a variety of Korean fortress construction techniques, but also because it bears witness to the exchange of important values of mankind and embodies various intangible values.

Namhansanseong consists of three different landscape components: a military component, a governmental component and a folklore landscape component. Each component is supported by authentic historical materials, and Namhansanseong’s integrity and authenticity were recognized by its inscription as UNESCO World Heritage in 2014.

Namhansanseong is preserved and managed by Gyeonggi-do Namhansanseong World Heritage Centre (NHSS WHC). All measures for conservation management at Namhansanseong are carried out by Gyeonggi-do NHSS WHC in collaboration with the Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea, local governments, Namhansanseong Management Committee and Namhansanseong Cultural Heritage Guardians.

Namhansanseong, Abschnitt des westlichen Walles mit Westtor. Foto: Ch. Ottersbach, 2011

 

Our Speaker:

PH.D. Doo-Won Cho is an expert on the World Heritage. He has studied in the Republic of Korea and in Germany architecture and monument preservation. He wrote his PH.D. thesis about the royal Korean fortress town Suwon and its historical documentation in the “Hwaseong Seongyeok Uigwe” at the chair of monument preservation of the Otto-Friedrichs-Universität Bamberg, Germany. He is General Secretary from Dec. 2019 of ICOFORT (International Scientific Committee for Fortifications and Military Heritage of ICOMOS) and he was ICOFORT Vice-president (2015–2019). He has worked extensively on the World Heritage Site Management of Korean fortress such as World Heritage Namhansanseong. He is one of team members for the formulation of ‘ICOFORT Charter on Fortifications and military heritage(draft)’. Currently, he is an Expert committee member of World Heritage Division for the Cultural Property of Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea since 2017. He is an adjunct professor of the World Heritage Department at the Konkuk University in Seoul 2015–2019. Doo-Won Cho is also member of the Marburger Arbeitskreis für europäische Burgenforschung e.V./Marburg Working Group on European Castle Research.

Doo-Won Cho has been in charge of planning on the cultural policy of the Gyeonggi Cultural Foundation and research on the tentative cultural heritage, intangible cultural heritage and memory of the world of Gyeonggi-do Province, ROK. Otherwise, he is working at the Cultural Heritage team of the Gyeonggi Cultural Foundation and is in charge of World Heritage monitoring, – nomination, – conservation and management on the tentatively selected Sites like DMZ, Bukhansanseong fortress, Doksansanseong fortress etc.

 

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_jIjFdXAvQ6KzYsO3W4qG8w

Or an H.323/SIP room system:

   H.323: 109.105.112.236 or 109.105.112.235

   Meeting ID: 618 7465 8438

   SIP: 61874658438@109.105.112.236 or 61874658438@109.105.112.235

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

 

Befestigte Plätze weltweit – Strongholds of the World

Interdisziplinäre Vortragsreihe des Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e. V. und der University of Aarhus, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, 2021

Allmählich begreifen wir Menschen, dass es nur eine Menschheit gibt, nur einen Homo Sapiens – überall auf der Welt. Es gibt keine unterschiedlichen Rassen, sondern nur verschiedene, äußerst reiche Kulturen. Wir haben mehr Verbindendes als Trennendes, mehr Gemeinsamkeiten als Unterschiede. Nicht zuletzt Covid 19 ist gerade dabei, uns diese Lektion zu lehren. Teil der Menschheitsgeschichte sind auch Gewalt und Gewaltkulturen und damit die Notwendigkeit, sich vor anderen zu schützen – auch wenn wir dies gerne ausblenden und verdrängen. Die Wissenschaft diskutiert seit einiger Zeit, wann und wie der „Krieg“ in die Welt kam, und ob dies mit der Sesshaftwerdung des Menschen in Zusammenhang steht. Fest steht, schon frühe Hochkulturen kannten das Bedürfnis sich vor anderen zu schützen und Leben und Eigentum gegen Angreifer zu verteidigen (vgl. hierzu Armin Eich: Die Söhne des Mars. Eine Geschichte des Krieges von der Steinzeit bis zum Ende der Antike. München 2015).

Europa kennt seit dem Frühmittelalter die Burg als bevorzugten Sitz der – weitgehend adeligen – Eliten in einer bis ins 18./19. Jahrhundert überwiegend durch das Lehenswesen geprägten Gesellschaft. Die politisch kleinräumige Organisation, Kriege und Fehden förderten bis ins 16. Jahrhundert den Bau solcher festen Wohnplätze, die Burg ist ein europaweites Phänomen von Portugal im Westen bis Russland im Osten, von Norwegen im Norden bis Malta und Griechenland im Süden – und sie wurde von den Europäern als Bau- und Wohnform bis in den Orient und ganz zu Anfang der Kolonialepoche sogar bis nach Westafrika, auf die Antillen und nach Indien exportiert und beeinflusste stilistisch sogar den Bau der äthiopischen Kaiserresidenz im frühen 17. Jahrhundert. Doch wie sah es in anderen Teilen bzw. Kulturen der Welt aus? Gab und gibt es auch dort „Burgen“ in diesem europäischen Sinne als Sitze von gesellschaftlichen Eliten? Oder gestalteten sich die Anlage und der Bau befestigter Wohnsitze ganz anders? Hatten solche Plätze eine ganz andere Funktion? Was waren hierfür die gesellschaftlichen und politischen Voraussetzungen? Japan hat bis ins 17. Jahrhundert beispielsweise eine zu Europa analoge Entwicklung durchgemacht und wurde trotz zahlloser kultureller Unterschiede zum Westen ähnlich wie dieses durch zahllose Sitze mehr oder weniger mächtiger Feudalherren und ihrer Vasallen geprägt. Auch Indien kennt Burgen, freilich in Ausmaßen, welche die Größe europäischer Fürsten- und Herrensitze bei weitem übertreffen. In China und Korea hingegen existierten seit ältesten Zeiten zentralistisch aufgebaute Reiche, in denen es keine Adelsburgen gab. Hingegen existierten u. a. im Korea der Choseon-Dynastie große Fluchtburgen für den König, den Hof und Teile der Bevölkerung. Ähnlich verhält es sich mit den großen muslimischen Reichen rund ums Mittelmeer und in Zentralasien. Und wie sah es im alten Amerika vor der Ankunft der Europäer aus? Gab es Burgen in Afrika südlich der Sahara? Wie schützten sich Menschen dort vor Angriffen ihrer Nachbarn? Wer waren die Bauherren befestigter Anlagen? Welche Rolle spielten sie in bewaffneten Konflikten um Land und Ressourcen oder religiösen Auseinandersetzungen? Gab es auch andernorts wie in Korea große Fluchtburgen? Und wie sahen gegebenenfalls Burgen und Schanzen im Rahmen von Belagerungen aus? Alle diese Fragen stellen sich auch mit dem Blick nach Ozeanien oder Neuseeland, wo die kriegerischen Maori stark befestigte Plätze errichteten.

In einer Vortragsreihe wollen der Marburger Arbeitskreis und die Universität Aarhus, research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”, diesen Fragen nachgehen und den eurozentrischen Blick weiten bzw. hinterfragen. Befestigte Anlagen aus aller Welt stehen im Mittelpunkt – und zwar vorzugsweise solche, die nicht seit dem 16. Jahrhundert von europäischen Kolonialherren, sondern seit dem Altertum von der autochthonen Bevölkerung bzw. nichteuropäischen Staaten und Gesellschaften errichtet wurden.

Die Vortragsreihe ist interdisziplinär angelegt, die Vorträge sind auf Grund der Kontinente übergreifenden Thematik und Internationalität auf Englisch.

Dardanellenburg Rumeli Hisari, Türkei, Mitte 15. Jahrhundert

Castles and Fortresses in the Times of Pestilence

Our virtual conference in collaboration with the Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies and its research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage” is now available as an online broadcast on YouTube:

InternationAl Colloquium – Castles and Fortresses in Times of Pestilence

A virtual conference of the Marburger Arbeitskreis für europäische Burgenforschung e.V./Marburg Working Group for European Castle Research e.V. in collaboration with the Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies and its research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”.

The virtual conference takes place on December 17, 2020 via a licence of the programme Zoom of Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies.

We are living in a very striking time right now. Entire countries, indeed the whole world is more or less in lockdown. In the meantime, there have been initial easing measures. While some welcome and enjoy the new/old life, others fear the next wave of infection. Throughout the whole year, our usual working tool of intellectual exchange, the conference, cannot be carried out – at least not in the traditional format. But we will not do entirely without and thus take the path, which nowadays is so popular: We will meet virtually.

Regarding the question of subject, we found: let us talk about the elephant in the room everybody is talking about anyhow: the pandemic. Covid 19 is a new epidemic, but pestilences are as old as humankind itself. Thus, the Black Death raged in Europe between 1346 and 1353 and caused 25 million deaths. It has recurred with many waves up to the 17th century and frightened people.

We now pose the question, which role castles and fortresses played in former centuries in the context of pandemics. Martin Luther wrote:

“My confidence and my castle, my God in whom I hope. For he will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler and from the noisome pestilence.”

In Luther’s view, the castle in this song turns out to be the symbol of divine protection against the plague. But what kind of function did real castles have in the case of a pandemic, was it the same? Do signs exist for a changed usage of weir systems during rampant epidemics?

 

Programme

12:45 Virtual Conference Room opened

13:00-13:15 Christian Ottersbach: Introduction

13:15-13:25 Rainer Atzbach: Introduction: The Black Death in Denmark and in front of Kiel Castle

13:25-13:35: Michael Nobel Hviid: The Royal Castle as a catalyst for dissemination

13:35-14:00: Dieter Lehmann – Discussion slot & Break

14:00-14:10 Lea Reiff: War and Pestilence. (Co-)relations between plague and warfare in literature and film, past and present

14:10-14:20 Dominik Gerd Sieber: Walls, Ditches and Gates contra Pestilence
. Castles in Upper Swabia during Times of Pestilence in 16th Century

14:20-14:40: Rainer Atzbach – Discussion slot

You are invited to this Zoom webinar.

When: Dec 17, 2020 12:30 PM Copenhagen

 

Topic: Castles and Fortresses in Times of Pestilence

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_FDBVBcdjRuKFdBZaWBJv4w

Or an H.323/SIP room system:

H.323: 109.105.112.236 or 109.105.112.235

Meeting ID: 674 7544 3008

SIP: 67475443008@109.105.112.236 or 67475443008@109.105.112.235

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

For further informations about the colloquium please contact:

Dieter Lehmann

info@dikoleh.de

or

Rainer Atzbach

rainer.atzbach@cas.au.dk

New Book: Castles and Fortifications during the reformation period

Unser neuer Tagungsband ist soeben erschienen, publiziert gemeinsam mit dem dänischen Verein “Magt, Borg og Landskab”. er versammelt die Referate unserer gemeinsamen Tagung in Zusammenarbeit mit der Universität Aarhus im Oktober 2017. Bestellt werden kann das Buch beim Verlag:

https://www.habelt.de/index.php?id=23

oder über den Buchhandel

Castles and Fortifications during the Reformation Period | Burgen und Befestigungen der Reformationszeit.
Ed. by Atzbach, Rainer/ Ottersbach, Christian/ Sørensen, Claus/ Kock, Jan/ Wille-Jørgensen, Dorthe. 2020. IV,360 S., zahlr. (überw. farb.) Abb., 30 cm.
(Reihe: Castles of the North, Band 3)

ISBN 978-3-7749-4210-3

(gebundener) Ladenpreis: EUR 60,00

CFP „Castles and fortresses in times of pestilence“ – international colloquium

Call for Papers

„Castles and fortresses in times of pestilence“
 international colloquium
December 17, 2020

 

A virtual conference of the Marburg Working Group for European Castle Research e.V. in collaboration with the Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies and its research programme “Materials, Culture and Heritage”.

The virtual conference takes place on December 17, 2020 via a licence of the programme Zoom of Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies.

We are living in a very striking time right now. Entire countries, indeed the whole world is more or less in lockdown. In the meantime, there have been initial easing measures. While some welcome and enjoy the new/old life, others fear the next wave of infection. Throughout the whole year, our usual working tool of intellectual exchange, the conference, cannot be carried out – at least not in the traditional format. But we will not do entirely without and thus take the path, which nowadays is so popular: We will meet virtually.

Regarding the question of subject, we found: let us talk about the elephant in the room everybody is talking about anyhow: the pandemic. Covid 19 is a new epidemic, but pestilences are as old as humankind itself. Thus, the Black Death raged in Europe between 1346 and 1353 and caused 25 million deaths. It has recurred with many waves up to the 17th century and frightened people.

We now pose the question, which role castles and fortresses played in former centuries in the context of pandemics. Martin Luther wrote:

“My confidence and my castle, my God in whom I hope. For he will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler and from the noisome pestilence.”

In Luther’s view, the castle in this song turns out to be the symbol of divine protection against the pestilence. But what kind of function did real castles have in the case of a pandemic, was it the same? Do signs exist for a changed usage of weir systems during rampant epidemics? There is evidence that such security measures were carried out in the palace of the counts of Hanau in the 16th century. The palace was transformed into a high security district in which flour and timber were hoarded for half a year and also great stocks of firewood as big as possible “so that there is less local transport to the palace in deadly times“. And there were archebuses provided for securing the palace against unauthorised intruders, people were virtually in the state of an armed quarantine.

 

The conference shall give an overview if there was or still is an interrelation between castles, palaces and fortresses with pestilence and what characterises this connection. Light can be shed on diverse aspects. To show an example, in a castle of the Rhineland region Jewish tombstones were built-in after a cemetery had been desecrated, because the Jews were blamed for the plague. Thus, the contributions can relate to single objects or it is also possible to give an overview. Also subjects regarding biological warfare with infected animal cadavers in the case of sieges are open for discussion.

 

The virtual conference gives us the opportunity to follow this trail of evidence on a large scale. Thus, the situation in Germany can be compared to that in France, England or the Baltic area, also Western Europe can be contrasted to Eastern Europe and further the Occident to the Orient and, last but not least, the Western World to the East Asian area. If Corona can act globally, so do we.

 

The topics of the contributions can cover the time up to the 19th century. Your contributions should not take longer than 10 minutes and are expected to be given in English. After the completion of two contributions a discussion, lasting 20 minutes, is scheduled.

We also plan to record and store your contributions for which we ask for your consent where necessary. When possible, there is the opportunity for a printed publication in our academic series „Castle Research“.

 

Please send us a short exposé (not more than one A4 page)
and a curriculum vitae
until September 30, 2020 to:

 

Dieter Lehmann | info@dikoleh.de

or

Rainer Atzbach | rainer.atzbach@cas.au.dk

 

We look forward to your contributions!


Call for Papers

 

Die Burg in Zeiten der Pestilenz – Internationale Tagung

 

Eine virtuelle Tagung des Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V. in Zusammenarbeit mit der Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology und ihres Forschungsprogramms “Materials, Culture and Heritage”

Am 17.12.2020 über eine Lizenz des Programms Zoom
der Aarhus University, Department of Archaeology

Wir leben momentan in einer ganz besonderen Zeit. Ganze Länder, ja die ganze Welt befinden sich im Lock down. Inzwischen gibt es wieder erste Lockerungen. Während die einen das neue / alte Leben begrüßen und genießen fürchten die anderen sich schon wieder vor der nächsten Infektionswelle. Unser übliches Werkzeug des direkten intellektuellen Austausches, die Tagung, wird das ganze Jahr nicht machbar sein – zumindest nicht im gewohnten Format. Aber wir wollen nicht ganz darauf verzichten und gehen deshalb den Weg den derzeit so viele gehen: Wir werden virtuell.

 

Bei der Frage das Themas haben wir uns gesagt: Sprechen wir doch über den Rosa Elefanten im Raum über den ohnehin jeder spricht: die Pandemie. Covid 19 ist eine neue Seuche, aber Pestilenzen sind so alt wie die Menschheit selbst. So wütete der Schwarze Tod zwischen 1346 und 1353 in Europa und forderte etwa 25 Millionen Todesopfer. Er kehrte bis ins 17. Jahrhundert in diversen Wellen wieder und schreckte die Menschen.

 

Wir stellen nun die Frage, welche Rolle Burgen und Befestigungen im Zusammenhang mit Pandemien in früheren Jahrhunderten spielten. Martin Luther schrieb:

 

„Meine Zuversicht und meine Burg, mein Gott, auf den ich hoffe. Denn er errettet dich vom Strick des Jägers und von der schädlichen Pestilenz.“

 

Für Luther wird in diesem Lied die Burg zum Symbol göttlichen Schutzes gegen die Pestilenz. Hatten aber auch reale Burgen im Falle einer Pandemie eine solche Funktion? Gibt es Anzeichen einer veränderten Nutzung von Wehranlagen während grassierender Seuchen? Für das Schloss der Grafen von Hanau lässt sich beispielsweise im 16. Jahrhundert nachweisen, dass besondere Sicherheitsmaßnahmen getroffen wurden. Es verwandelte sich in einen Hochsicherheitsbezirk, in dem man Mehl und Holz für ein halbes Jahr hortete, ebenso möglichst große Brennholzvorräte, „domit in sterbß zeidten nit viel hienein farens ist.“ Und man legte Hakenbüchsen bereit, um das Schloss gegen unbefugten Eindringen zu sichern, man begab sich quasi in bewaffnete Quarantäne.

 

Die Tagung soll einen Überblick versuchen, ob und wenn ja, welchen Zusammenhang es zwischen Burgen, Schlössern oder Festungen mit der Pestilenz gab oder gibt. Dabei können ganz unterschiedliche Aspekte beleuchtet werden. So wurden in einer Burg im Rheinischen jüdische Grabsteine verbaut, nachdem man einen Friedhof geschändet hatte, weil man den Juden die Schuld für die Pest gab. Die Beiträge können sich also auf einzelne Objekte beziehen oder auch einen Überblick geben. Auch Fragen der biologischen Kriegführung bei Belagerungen mittels infizierter Tierleichen stehen im Raum.

 

Die virtuelle Tagung bietet uns die besondere Möglichkeit, diesen Spuren großflächig nachzugehen. So können die Situation in Deutschland mit der in Frankreich, England oder dem baltischen Raum, aber auch West- mit Osteuropa und das Abendland mit dem Morgenland und nicht zuletzt mit dem ostasiatischen Raum verglichen werden. Wenn Corona weltweit agiert, dann können wir das auch.

 

Ihre Beiträge sollen nicht länger als 20 min. dauern und auf Englisch gehalten werden. Wir beabsichtigen auch einen Speicherung der Beiträge, wozu wir gegebenenfalls Ihr Einverständnis benötigen. Eventuell besteht die Möglichkeit einer gedruckten Publikation in unserer wissenschaftlichen Reihe “Burgenforschung”.

 

Tagungssprache ist Englisch.

 

Bitte senden Sie uns bis 30.09.2020
ein kurzes Exposee (maximal 1 DIN A4-Seite)
und einen Lebenlauf an:

 

Dieter Lehmann | info@dikoleh.de

oder

Rainer Atzbach | rainer.atzbach@cas.au.dk

 

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Beiträge!

Tagung in Detmold

21. bis 23. Juni 2019

Burgen, Schlösser und Städte in Ostwestfalen und Umgebung

Tagung des Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V. und des Lippischen Landesmuseums Detmold

Ort: Lippsches Landesmuseum Detmold, Ameide 4, 32756 Detmold

Ostwestfalen und die angrenzenden Regionen bildeten im Hochmittelalter den Kern vieler Herrschaftsbereiche, die sich bis in die Frühe Neuzeit zu kleineren und größeren Territorialherrschaften ausbilden sollten. Allein auf dem Gebiet des heutigen Kreises Lippe existierten bis ins Spätmittelalter vier unterschiedliche größere Herrschaften, die im Lauf der Jahrhunderte durch die Familie zur Lippe in ihr Territorium einverleibt wurden. Jedes dieser Geschlechter hinterließ eine oder mehrere Burgen und befestigte Städte, die ihnen als Ausgangspunkte ihrer Wirtschafts- und Machtpolitik dienten. Die über Jahrhunderte dauernden Formierungsprozesse in Ostwestfalen hinterließen daher eine an Burgen, Schlössern, Städten sowie weiteren Wohn- und Wehrbauten reiche Gegend, deren Erforschung in vielen Bereichen noch in den Kinderschuhen steckt.
So geben zum Beispiel die Untersuchungen zu Anlagen wie die Falkenburg und den später errichteten Burgen der Edelherren zur Lippe einen guten Einblick in die Burgenpolitik dieser Familie. Hingegen zeigen neuste Untersuchungen im Pyrmonter/Lügder Raum, dass noch dringender Forschungsbedarf zur Formierung dieses Gebiets Mitte des 13. Jahrhunderts besteht: eine bisher ins frühe Hochmittelalter datierte Burg stellte sich bei Grabungen in jüngster Zeit als zerstörte Burgbaustelle des 13. Jahrhunderts heraus und muss im Zusammenhang mit den Fehden dieser Zeit gesehen werden.
Die Transitionsepoche vom Mittelalter zur Frühen Neuzeit zeichnet sich in Ostwestfalen vor allem durch feste Renaissanceschlossbauten aus. Artilleriefestungen hingegen wurden kaum gebaut und auch bei den Städten ist ein deutlicher Rückgang im Innovationswillen (oder –vermögen?) zu erkennen. Während mit den Schlössern von Detmold und Brake große verteidigungsfähige repräsentative Anlagen entstehen, schleppt sich der Bau der Festung Sparrenberg zäh durch die Jahrzehnte und wird im Endeffekt nie abgeschlossen.
Im Rahmen der Tagung im Lippischen Landesmuseum Detmold soll versucht werden, einen Überblick über den Wehr- und Wohnbau in Ostwestfalen zu geben. Dabei werden Entwicklungsstränge ebenso im Fokus stehen, wie auch politische, wirtschaftliche und architektonische Aspekte von Einzelanlagen.

Programm

Freitag 21.06.

09:30 Begrüßung im Museum durch Michael Zelle und Christian Ottersbach
09:50 Johannes Müller-Kissing
Von der Falkenburg zum Schusterrondell – Fortifikatorische Entwicklungslinien in Lippe
10:20 Michael Koch
Das hoch- und spätmittelalterliche Burgenbauprogramm der Reichsabtei Corvey
10:50 Diskussion

11:00 Kaffeepause

11:20 Frank Huismann
Burgmannen auf Varenholz – Zur Bau- und Besitzergeschichte einer lippischen Burg im Spätmittelalter
11:50 Stefan Leenen
Großzügige Bauprojekte in guter Lage – Herrschaftsmittelpunkte der Grafen von Ravensberg und Isenberg
12:20 Diskussion

12:30 Mittagspause

14:30 Thomas Künzel
Dassel und die Burg Hunnesrück:
Burgen- und Stadtplanung als Spiegel der „großen Politik“ um 1200?
15:00 Jens Berthold
Neues zur Rehburg und zur Archäologie an Befestigungsanlagen zwischen Hameln und Hoya
15:30 Diskussion

15:45 Kaffeepause

16:00 Markus Blaich
Neues zu einer alten Grabung: Die Heisterburg bei Bad Nenndorf, Ldkr. Schaumburg
16:30 Ulrich Meier
Neue Überlegungen zu Burg und Stadt Blomberg
17:00 Diskussion

19:00 Festvortrag Hans-Werner Peine
Von Lipperode zur Holsterburg. Dreißig Jahre Burgenforschung in Ostwestfalen
Anschließend Empfang im Museum

Samstag 22.06. Exkursionstag

09:00 Abfahrt am Landestheater
09:30 Besichtigung Falkenburg
12:30 Mittagspause auf Schloss Brake
13:30 Besichtigung Schloss Brake mit Führung durch das Schloss
15:00 Besichtigung der Stadtbefestigung Lemgo mit Führung

18:00 Vollversammlung des Marburger Arbeitskreises für europäische Burgenforschung e.V. im Johannettental 2

Sonntag 23.06.

09:30 Stefan Eismann
Burgen des Spätmittelalters im Landkreis Holzminden
10:00 Roland Linde
Auch nicht an einem Tag gebaut: Die lange Genese der lippischen Gründungsstadt Lemgo
10:30 Diskussion

10:45 Kaffeepause

11:00 Joachim Schween
Die Klütfestung bei Hameln – „Gibraltar des Nordens“
11:30 Frank Pütz
Schloss und Festung Pyrmont im Kontext der Schlossbauten des Fürsten
Friedrich Anton Ulrich von Waldeck und Pyrmont
12:00 Diskussion

12:15 Mittagspause

14:00 Thomas Dann
Fürstlich-lippische Schlossbauten und ihre Ausstattungen im 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert
14:30 Heiko Laß
Schlösser, Rittergüter und Herrensitze des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts in Ostwestfalen-Lippe und ihre Deckenmalerei
15:00 Heinrich Stiewe
Fachwerkbau des Spätmittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit in Ostwestfalen-Lippe – ein Überblick (Arbeitstitel)
15:30 Abschlussdiskussion
16:00 Tagungsende

Anmeldung bitte bis zum 07. Juni 2019 an:
Heike Lennier, Lippisches Landesmuseum Detmold, Ameide 4, 32756 Detmold
oder unter:
lennier@lippisches-landesmuseum.de
Tel.: 05231 992519

Tagungs- und Exkursionsgebühren:

Tagungsgebühr 40,00 €
Ermäßigte Gebühr 20,00 € (Studenten, Einzeltagesteilnehmer, Mitglieder MAB)
Gebühr nur Exkursion 10,00 €

Zahlungsweise:

Die Tagungs- und Exkursionsgebühren sind im Voraus zu überweisen auf das Konto des Landesverbandes Lippe, IBAN: DE06 4765 0130 0000 0046 89 Sparkasse Paderborn-Detmold. Geben Sie bei der Überweisung bitte als Verwendungszweck den Kostenträger: 0425250200, Tagung Burgenforschung und Ihren Namen an.

Bitte überweisen Sie zur Entlastung der Tagungsorganisation rechtzeitig. Sollte die Zahlung nicht bis zum Montag, dem 17. Juni 2019 auf dem Konto eingegangen sein, wird bei der Anmeldung Bareinzahlung verlangt.

Hotelbuchungen müssen die Teilnehmer selbst vornehmen. Angebote für Unterkünfte finden sie unter www.detmold.de.

Burgenforschung Band 4 erschienen

Der neueste Band der Burgenforschung ist noch zu Ende 2018 aus der Druckerei gekommen. Er trägt den Titel “Neues zur Burgenerfassung und Burgenforschung in Baden-Württemberg” und umfasst die Vorträge unserer Tagung 2016 in Esslingen am Neckar. Der Bogen wird dabei vom Frühmittelalter bis ins frühe 20. Jahrhundert gespannt und reicht von der Großmotte bis zu Wiederaufbauprojekten im Sinne des wissenschaftlichen Historismus. Der perfekte Leseeinstieg ins neue Jahr, der mit Sicherheit eine Reihe von Anregungen bietet, in Baden-Württemberg auf Burgentour zu gehen.

Marburger Correspondenzblog zur Burgenforschung

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search